Animal Tourism Finland goes Mallorca

Last week, I was in Palma as part of an Erasmus teacher exchange. During my visit, I gave two lectures about the use of animals in tourism at the University of the Balearic Islands (UIB). In the lectures, I talked about the relationship between consumer values and animal welfare within a tourism context. I based my lectures on the research done in the project “Animals and Responsible Tourism” and “Animal Welfare in Tourism Services”.

Animals in Mallorca

Although animal-based tourism activities could be one the reasons for visiting a tourism destination, this may not be the case of the Balearic Islands. Nevertheless, animals are clearly part of the experiences of many tourists spending their holidays on these Mediterranean Islands. Animal-based attraction such as marine parks, aquariums and zoos are part of the marketing material and street view of most Balearic towns. In particular, tourism companies are targeting these attractions to families traveling with children. Also scuba diving, which is popular among some tourists, should not be forgotten. After all, it is as animal-based activity whereby marine fauna become an essential part of the underwater experience.

 

Photo: J.C. García-Rosell

City tours on Galeras

Another popular animal-based activity, which one can see in most towns, is the horse carriages or so called “Galeras”. The Galeras usually operate in the historic city centers. When I asked the students to think about animal welfare in relation to the Balearic Islands, the first thing that came to their mind was the Galeras. The students were concerned about the welfare of the horses working under challenging conditions. Concerned citizens have publicly been debating this issue in Palma.

Indeed, over the last years several horse deaths and accidents have happened on the streets of this Mediterranean destination. The horses have to trot over hard surface (pavement, stone) and deal with high temperatures, particularly, during the summer months. Without appropriate watering and feeding, these horses suffered of dehydration and undernourishment. There also seems to be no control over the number of working hours and amount of weight to be pulled by the animals.

 

Photo: J.C. García-Rosell

 

We can ask ourselves the following questions: Can the local government guarantee the welfare of horses through stricter regulation? Or does this case demand the absolute ban of the Galeras?  There is indeed a movement collecting firms to stop the galeras in Palma, Mallorca. The movement is called “Stop Galeras”. This movement form part of global criticism on the use of horses for tourism activities in cities. We can see similar discussions taken place in cities like Montreal, New York and Melbourne. According to the criticism, horses do not belong on city streets. A city environment with traffic and crowd of people is already detrimental to the welfare of any horse.

 

Text: José-Carlos García-Rosell

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